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Three

by on 21 August 2022

Wit, Compassion and Hope

Three

by Christie Peto

Dangerosity at the Canal Café until 21st August

Review by Heather Moulson

Walking into the Canal Theatre Café was akin to walking into the Kit Kat club in pre-war Berlin, but without Sally Bowles.  An opulent setting with round tables, an air of splendour, and an enticing proscenium arch stage met the eye.

The two hander ninety minute drama, Three was well-crafted, the central figure being played by the writer, Christie Peto alongside Patch, played by Hannah Harquart. The latter role represents an alter-ego, mentor or possibly guardian angel.  Harquart covered all three of these persona with energy and gusto with her strong stage presence, while Peto gave an honest and sincere account of breakdown and other mental health issues.  The writing was relevant and identifiable, with wit and understanding.

Woman, played by Peto, was recovering, or at least coming to terms with herself, after a coffee throwing incident at work .  Under the shadow of talking to ‘Susan’ or her mother on the phone, she reflected on the pointlessness of allegedly comforting things – candles, music and bathing.  Meanwhile her mentor cum co-star confessed to her own exhaustion and how her resources had run dry.  There were some zippy one-liners in this exchange and a strong rapport between the two performers. 

The simplicity of the piece, such as comparing one’s messy bag to a messy mind, and questioning what was good for one’s soul was nicely done.  A silver cloud appeared as a first date promised potential fulfilment, despite the long journey ahead.  Then Woman was finally able to talk to ‘Susan’ on the phone. The ending was optimistic and strong.  This piece sent out hope and support to similar sufferers and was wittily compassionate.   There was no preaching. 

Camden Fringe 2022

Christie Peto and Hannah Harquart are performers worth looking out for.   It was an admirable writing debut production for Christie Peto and directed sensitively by Sophie McMahon, who was also credited as technician, and handled the lighting and sound effects with skill and sensitivity.   

Heather Moulson, August 2022

Photography courtesy of Dangerosity

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